Is College Worth It?

1155 words, 5 pages

Intro Sample...


Going to college and getting a degree does not necessarily guarantee that an individual is going to get a job right after graduation. It is hard out there for recent graduates to find a good job since there is so much competition due to the increasing accessibility of a college education. Even if they do get a job, it is usually not in what they got their degree for. They have to find some sort of job to pay off all the debt that their college education has cost them.
Many college students would feel that college is a waste of money because they do not learn what they want to. Instead they have to take classes that have close to nothing to do with their major but are only taking these classes in order to fulfill a general educational requirement. "This Gen Ed thing is really stupid," says a physical therapy major at SUNY Buffalo. "Taking these classes that I won't need is just wasting time I feel that could be spent more on classes within my major. Plus, if I do bad in these classes, it will bring down my overall GPA, which is so important for my major." Upon graduation, some feel that they are at a disadvantage because more time could have spent on learning more within their field of study and less time on irrelevant materials.
The major reason of going to college is, of course, to get a good job. College prepares us with academic knowledge in order to succeed in the future. According to Ernest Boyner's concept of the "New American College", higher education is essential for preparation for one's future. He states that: “In spatial terms, teaching and learning may begin in a classroom, but course work also spills over into the life of the campus and the community. Students engage in experiential learning and co-curricular activities that take abstract ideas and anchor them in real-life problems.” As the competition to get a decent job is in View More »

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