Mongolians In China

1632 words - 7 pages

Intro Sample...


Jordy Grant 03/09/2008
Essay # 3 History

The Mongolians were one of the greatest societies the world has ever known. The Mongolian Empire was the largest contiguous empire in world history, and for some time was the most feared in Eurasia. How did the Mongols manage to gain and control so much territory? They managed to conquer areas today known as Tibet, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Korea, Russia, and invaded the territories of Poland, Hungary, Japan, Egypt, Vietnam and Persia and many more. The Mongolian Empires single greatest defeat was that of the Chinese Empire.
The Mongols did not have cities, town or villages. They moved from place to place, and never stayed in one area for long. Mongols lived (called yurts)... View More »

Body Sample...


The Mongols would use catapults to attack walled cities. The Mongolians would also use exploding arrows and gunpowder projectiles developed by the Chinese. The Mongols were not scared to incorporate those they had conquered into their armies and governments, and often used this tactic to increase their armies and use this technique to better understand the land they were conquering. Chinggis would assign one man, an elite bodyguard, often trained directly under him, to tens of thousands of sons and brothers of commanders, whom could pass him position on to his son, although Chinggis could remove them from their position at will. Chinggis would murder entire town and cities at will, often to prevent retribution, and to show other people what he was capable of doing, often capturing women of the town and incorporate them into the Mongol society.
Chinggis raided Jin territory in 1205 and 1209 and in 1211 launched a major campaign against the Chinese. He led an army of about fifty thousand bowmen, and his three sons led armies of similar size. The Jin thought that their army was the strongest in the world, and consisted of one hundred and fifty thousand cavalry and more than three hundred thousand Chinese infantry men. The Mongols would capture a city, plunder all the treasures, and then retreat. The Jin would then retake the city, but were left with food shortages and destruction. During this period, the Jin did not have a stable leadership. The Jin would often kill their leaders, hoping to replace them with another man, and this led to an unstable leadership. In 1214 ...

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