How “Civilized” Were The People Of North America Before The Arrival Of Europeans?

748 words, 3 pages

Intro Sample...


The Indians made good use to land. During the different seasons they would travel from place to place in order to find the best for a certain period – In summer, they went to an area where it was easy to grow props, in winter, when there wasn't as much vegetation left, they would go to a place where you could hunt easier and get all the food you needed.
The native Americans knew very well how to fish, hunt, plant crops, etc to get food all throughout the year. The weapons they used were bow and arrow, war club, spear, fishing spear. The really mastered these and knew how to handle them much better then Europeans who didn't all need to know that as they had farms. The weapons were made out of stone, metal and wood (sometimes). They were decorated with feathers and paint.
To go fishing, as well as the fishing spear the Indians used canoes. They didn't need more land like Europeans so they didn't go out to sea. The went fishing near to the shore and didn't need huge boats to “explore”.
The Indians were even a few steps ahead of Europeans in medicine- they could cure almost any desiease in the human body using traditional medicine- plants, animals, other substances, adding a mix of “magic to it” that would apparently help the spell.
The Indians had pretty simple houses. That was reasoned by the warm climate. They could have built houses as complicated as European if it was requested by the environment. They actually had a few temples with European standards even before Europeans came, which shows they weren't really much behind on architecture.
Talking about temples, the Native Americans actually had some beautiful artwork, which tells you a lot about their culture. It was mainly paintings, sculptures and masks.
To end with, the Indians only wanted peace and were willing to share the land with Europeans The Europeans were the uncivilized ones to take what the Indians offered them, not follow any rules of the treati View More »

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