How Does Charlotte Bronte Create Sympathy For Jane In The First Two Chapters Of Jane Eyre

1249 words, 5 pages

Intro Sample...


The novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte, focuses on Jane, the protagonist. In the first two chapters of the book the reader’s follow the early years of Jane’s life, her at the young age of 10 living in Gateshead with her uncle’s wife, and her cousins, as well as two servants. The chapters introduce the reader’s to what Jane’s life has been like while she was staying at Gateshead. The narrative Bronte uses as well as her description of the settings and the treatment that Jane receives from all the other characters all aid in creating a sense of sympathy towards Jane.

One of the main ways in which Bronte creates sympathy for Jane in the first two chapters of the novel is through the characters; their opinions, thoughts, and... View More »

Body Sample...


She uses pathetic fallacy, which is the use of weather or other aspects of nature to reflect or contradict the emotions that a certain character is feeling, most often the protagonist. In this case she uses it as a parallel to emphasise Jane’s emotions. It is used in the first paragraph of the first chapter, “…the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating…” This shows how Jane feels in Gateshead. It compliments the emotions she feels in chapters one and two, the rain a metaphor for the tears she sheds in the red room. A recurring description of the setting is the presence of the colour red, which brings forth ideas of danger and passion. The reader’s learn that Jane is quite a passionate young girl, and the descriptions of the red curtains that Jane uses to hide in the first chapter foreshadow her want to hide from the red room in the second chapter. The contradiction between the two descriptions and Jane’s reactions towards them highlight her misery, she is always in a state of wanting to hide from something.

Between Jane entering the red room in the beginning of chapter two and her fainting at the end of the chapter, she goes through quite a few very strong emotions and feelings. Her description of the range and depth of emotions cause the readers’ to pity her as well as fee empathetic towards her. The largest aspect is that she is merely 10 years of age, she has no one in the world, and the people she has to live with aren’t just intolerant of her, they actively seek to make her feel miserable.

The narrative in the novel ...

Read More

Related Essays on How Does Charlotte Bronte Create Sympathy For Jane In The First Two Chapters Of Jane Eyre

  • Where The Men Rule An Analysis Of Masculinity In Jane Eyre

    2507 words, 11 pages

    Jane Eyre depicts the journey of a young and lonely girl as she matures into an independent woman. Jane grows from an emotional orphan under the strict rules of her despised Aunt’s household into a mature woman, with the ability to think for herself and realize what she should deserve. However, as she matures, her interactions with various male characters in her journey to becoming independent put her in a subordinate position to each. While these characters prove to be valuable to the mental toughness and maturity she gains as an adult, each claims some hold of superiority, whether it is phys

    View Document »

    An Analysis Of Charlotte Brontes Portray Of Jane Eyre

    3152 words, 13 pages

    An Analysis of Charlotte Bronte’s Portray of Jane Eyre I. Introduction The development of Jane Eyre’s character is central to the novel. From the beginning, Jane possesses a sense of her self-worth and dignity, a commitment to justice and principle, a trust in God, and a passionate disposition. Her integrity is continually tested over the course of the novel, and Jane must learn to balance the frequently conflicting aspects of her so as to find contentment. An orphan since early childhood, Jane feels exiled and ostracized at the beginning of the novel, and the cruel

    View Document »

    Rebellion And Reconciliation

    1658 words, 7 pages

    It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Eyre is a masterpiece in British and world literature. Almost two centuries have elapsed; deliberations on this novel show no sign of waning. Some critics extolled it as the vanguard of awakening feminism. As ZengXuemei put it, “the heroine’s strong desire for liberation of personality, independence of character and equality renders her the most fascinating female character in Victorian time.” On the other hand, the novel was lashed out at as it tramples on the conventions on which we pride ourselves and were followed by

    View Document »

    Jane Eyre As Charlotte Bront's Autobiography

    1498 words, 6 pages

    It is not unusual for authors to write themselves into their protagonists. Intentionally or not, many authors have written their autobiographies this way. These kinds of autobiographies are usually enriched with elements of fiction and as a rule they are meant to be just made up stories. More often than not, readers view books only on that level, unless they are familiar with the autho's life. A great example of a book being somewhere on the border of fiction and autobiography is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bront. As it was first published under the name of Currer Bell, the readers had a harder tim

    View Document »

    In What Ways Might Jane Eyre Be Considered A Feminist Novel

    1080 words, 5 pages

    Feminism has been a prominent and controversial topic in writings for over the past two centuries, with the view articulating in the “19th century meaning that women are inherently equal to men and deserve equal rights and opportunities.”[Kathryn Vanspanckeren. 2006] Many women throughout time have stood forward towards women’s rights, however none so much as Mary Wollstonecraft who changed idea’s about women’s intellectual and emotional life and their role in society in the 1800’s, through her book A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre was

    View Document »

    What Do We Learn About The Position Of Women In Jane Eyre

    1491 words, 6 pages

    Jane Eyre was Charlotte Bronte’s first successful novel. Published in 1847, Bronte presents us with critique of Victorian assumptions regarding social class and gender. Very ahead of its time, Charlotte Bronte publicly Known as Currer Bell caused much commotion. In her novel, Bronte explores many issues of Victorian society such as women’s stature both generally and amongst poor in the 19th century. She also explores patriarchal male domination, and the segregation and unspoken restrictions between the different classes.   Society in Britain in the 19th century was very different to today’

    View Document »

    Women Feminism And Social Class

    1500 words, 6 pages

    Women in the Victorian Age were mostly housewives. These women stayed home doing house work, focusing on taking care of their children and doing chores. During this time period, women never traveled alone, either with their husband or someone from their family. The men of the Victorian Era believed that a women’s place was at home. Women didn’t have many rights regarding education, owning property and marriage. There were 3 classes of women, the lower, the middle and the upper class. The wealthy women had an easy going life. They wore fancy clothes and attended many parties throughout the day.

    View Document »

    Jane Eyre

    1255 words, 6 pages

    Zac Starke The Novel 603-212-DW Louise Slater Rochester as a Child in Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre In the novel, Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, Jane is subconsciously enticed by Rochester’s childish nature because she sees in him an opportunity to claim the sense of a childhood which she never had. This claim can be supported through an analysis of the text which provides substantial evidence that Rochester is basically a child in nature; that Jane is drawn to Rochester’s childish mentality due to her pre-disposition and need

    View Document »

    Jane Eyre A Feminist Novel

    1510 words, 7 pages

    Jane Eyre: A Feminist Novel Jane Eyre is a novel written in 1847 by Charlotte Bronte. During these times, women were supposed to be “seen and not heard”. They were expected to be subservient to men and quietly obedient. Typically, they were housewives, teachers, or nurses. However, Jane Eyre was not a stereotypical Victorian woman. Throughout the novel, she speaks out, is independent, and is very educated. All of these characteristics were not common for women in the 1840’s. Charlotte Bronte is trying to convey a message about women’s rights in this book. Fe

    View Document »

    Sympathy By Emilly Bronte

    3659 words, 15 pages

    ENGLISH POETRY ANALYSIS OF SYMPATHY Ratnanggana A. M. P (A2B008078) ENGLISH DEPARTMENT FACULTY OF HUMANITY DIPONEGORO UNIVERSITY 2011 TABLE OF CONTENT CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A. Background of the study 2 B. Purpose of the study 2 C. Scope of the study 3 CHAPTER II THE POET, THE POEM, THE TRANSLATION A. The Poet 4 B. The Poem 6 C. The Translation 7 CHAPTER III FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE A. Metaphor 8 B. Personification 9 C. Imagery 9 CHAPTER IV ANALYSIS OF THE POEM 11 CHAPTER V CONCLUSSION 17

    View Document »

More Popular Essays

Research help is just moments away!