William James

2187 words, 9 pages

Intro Sample...


Coe, their art teacher, was talented, he even involved the students in his own work. Which ranged from tiny "drawing cards" to larger oils on panel boards. At 11, William found that he loved to draw. Anyone looking for him at home could find him in the back parlor bent over his pad, drawing for hours on end. The boys had attended that school for a year and Henry decided to withdraw them and try another school. Being so young, the buys were confused about why they had to leave a school they enjoyed so much, but their parents gave them no reason. If you look at later patterns of Henry's taking the buys from schools and tutors, it could be that William's love for art frightened his father. Art threatened to change Henry's influence over his son. He would not allow that to happen.
Throughout 1859 and 1860 he is overseas. He goes to school and has private tutors in Switzerland and Germany. He also attend a European university. William left on the Atlantic with his family the summer of 1855. He left his friends, the home where he had spent most of his childhood, and a sense of independence that he would not find in Europe. William was over-joyed when his father decided to leave London six weeks early. On June 30, 1858, he was back in America. The family spent July with their many relatives in Albany. James toyed with the idea of becoming a painter. While taking lessons in the Newport, Rhode Island, studio of William Morris Hunt in 1859 and 1860, he and his younger brother and student Henry met John La Farge, who had recently returned from studying art in Paris. After hearing of all John La Farge’s stories, William was even more incouraged to become a painter.
By early September of 1858 Henry Sr. was so irritated he decided he had made a mistake to come back to America. "I have grown so discouraged about the education of my children here, and dread so those inevitable habits of extravagance and insubordination which appear to be the cha View More »

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