Aids In Black Women

1560 words, 7 pages

Intro Sample...


A recent study states that HIV probably moved from Africa to Haiti and then entered the United States around 1969.
In today’s American society approximately 54% of the new HIV/AIDS cases diagnosed in the U.S. are Black. AIDS is the leading cause of death for women, including African American women, aged twenty-five thru thirty-four years, the third leading cause of death for black women aged thirty-five thru forty-four years, the fourth leading cause of death for black women aged forty-five thru fifty-five years, the fourth leading cause of death for Hispanic women aged thirty-five thru forty-four years. The only diseases causing more deaths of women were cancer and heart disease.
Most women are infected with HIV through high-risk heterosexual contact. A woman is significantly more likely than a man to contract AIDS infection during vaginal intercourse. Additionally, the presence of some sexually transmitted diseases greatly increases the likelihood of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection.
Women are more likely to get HIV for several biological reasons.
• There is a more exposed surface area in the female genitals than in the male genitals.
• There are higher levels of HIV in semen than in vaginal fluids.
• More semen is exchanged during sex than vaginal fluids.
• Women often have untreated STDs, which makes them more likely to get HIV.
Many HIV positive women with negative partners worry about giving HIV to their partners. While research shows that men give HIV more easily than women give the virus, women can still pass HIV to uninfected partners, both male and female, through sex. This is because HIV is in blood which does include menstrual blood, vaginal fluids, and in cells in the vaginal and anal walls.
HIV levels in vaginal fluids also increase a lot in the presence of vaginal yeast infections and STDs. Swelling of the vagina, a common symptom of such infections, causes tiny scr View More »

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