Ketamine - A Psychoactive Drug

1321 words, 6 pages

Intro Sample...


The pill is taken orally or crushed and smoked or mixed with water and injected. Special K is frequently used with other drugs, the popular choices to add to Special K are ecstasy, heroin, and cocaine. Taking Ketamine with downers (like alcohol, Valium, or GHB) is extremely dangerous!

This is one users description of the high from the drug Ketamine.
“If you’re on a dancefloor, music can sound so heavy, weird and strangely compelling, lights see, very intense and physical so-ordination can fall apart along with an overall feeling of numbness. Some people feel paralyzed by the drug, unable to speak without slurring, while other, like myself, either feel sick or throw up.”

Here, another now sober, user warns about the drug Ketamine.
“Be extremely careful how much Ketamine you take - it’s stronger than the same amount of speed or coke and the more you wolf down, the stronger the effects. Accept that you may well be in for a rough ride with the drug as its effects and unpredictable and sometimes very confusing. Try not to mix it with other drugs, particularly alcohol. Make sure you take it in a safe environment with friends who know what you’re up to. Remember, it’s an anaesthetic, so if you hurt yourself you may not feel and pain. Like all drugs, it’s best to be in good mental and physical health before taking anything!”


Liquid Ketamine was developed in the 1960s by Calvin Stevens at Park Davis Labs as an anesthetic to replace PCP for surgeries, it was also used on the battlefields of Vietnam as an anesthetic. Powdered Ketamine didn’t emerge as a recreational drug until the 1970s, and was known as "Vitamin K" in the 1980s. It came back in the 1990s when rave scenes came about and club drugs became popular, then it was known as "Special K." Deaths related to drugs popular at raved have increased a lot in the past View More »

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