Legalization Of Marijuana

678 words, 3 pages

Intro Sample...


But we do know that it tilts the balance of chemicals that regulate mood, energy, appetite and attention and reduces logical thinking and calculating skills. Once inhaled, the THC reaches your brain within seconds. The cannabinoid receptors are activated by a neurotransmitter called anandamide. THC and anandamide are cannabinoid chemicals. The THC binds with cannabinoid receptors and activates neurons, which causes unpleasant effects on the mind and body. High concentrations of cannabinoid receptors are in the hippocampus, cerebellum and basal ganglia. The hippocampus is located within the temporal lobe and is important for short-term memory. When the THC binds with the cannabinoid receptors inside the hippocampus, it interferes with the memory of recent events. THC also affects coordination, which is controlled by the cerebellum. The basal ganglia controls unconscious muscle movements, which is why motor coordination is impaired when under the influence of marijuana. Accounts of increased food intake have always been reported by marijuana smokers; the so-called munchies. Overall, studies show that people using marijuana eat more but the food they eat is generally snack food, like cookies and junk food. They also exercise less and sleep more, all of which contributes to weight gain.


Works Cited
1. Bonsor, Kevin. "How Marijuana Works." How Stuff Works. 2006. How Stuff Works, Inc.. 26 Sep 2006 .
2. "Cannabis (drug)." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 26 Sep 2006, 14:52 UTC. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 26 Sep 2006 .
3. "Marijuana Abuse." NIDA. 1 July 2005. National Institute of Health. 26 Sep 2006 .
4. "How Marijuana Smoking Affects The Body." Schick Shadel Hospital. 2004. Schick Shadel Hospital. 26 Sep 2006 . View More »

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