The Rising Epedemic Among Black Women In America

1870 words, 8 pages

Intro Sample...


Most infected persons eventually progress from a state of good health to severe disease (CDC, 1986)

Since the immune system is a network of cells, organs and proteins that work together to defend and protect the body from potentially harmful, infectious microorganisms such s bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi. Human’s immune system also plays a critical role in preventing the development and spread of many types of cancer. AIDS is the missing factor of the immune system. This virus can live in the body undetected for months or years before any sign of illness appears. The virus is spread by sexual contact, needle sharing, or less commonly through blood or blood products or organ donation. The most prominent of highly commonly way is through sexual contact. American females have become of a significant high because of many factors. Undiagnosed and untreated STDs are the most common factor. It has become knowledgeable that HIV infections have been the dominate factor in African American women and their relationships with men that have been infected through sexual contact.

Literature Review

Why has the epidemic of AIDS risen in the African American women? The AIDS virus has affected African Americans more than any other racial or ethnic group in the United States. Representing only 13% of the U.S. population, African-American adults and adolescents comprise more than half of all HIV/AIDS cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For African Americans this situation is as a state of emergency as it stands today.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention started examining the size and depth of this epidemic. The center started using new technology that would allow researchers to learn more details about an individual with HIV in 2003. Some of the findings are:

a. Men who have sex with men accounted for 53 percent of all new infections.

b. Black gay View More »

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