The Role Of Women In The Church

1995 words, 8 pages

Intro Sample...


However, in dealing with gender Paul simply writes, In whatever condition you were called, brother and sisters, there remain with God. Paul is not being as explicit as he was in Galatians. Why he backs off the strong argument he made in Galatians is debatable. However, later in the first letter to Corinth Paul seems to retreat even more. In 1 Cor 12:13, Paul again presents the idea of everyone being baptized as one in Jesus. Nevertheless, he makes no effort to mention the gender issues directly. He does allude to it by writing, For in the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body 1 Cor 12:13 but never addresses the male and female issue officially. Paul simply deals with the Jew or Gentile and the slave or free in this verse, these are the same two distinctions as he did in 1 Cor 7:17-24.

The effort Paul makes to have his teachings stay somewhat consistent from one letter to the next lends support to the idea that the formula Paul uses was an outline that predates his writings. It can be considered that this passage could have been a pre-Pauline baptismal formula that Paul cites. It could be that Paul simply adapted the formula by adding the male female phrase as an effort to fully portray his own views. It is possible Christians at the time would know that formula this was used in baptisms. Thus, by manipulating the formula, Paul may have been attempting to show people that the church could change and adapt to meet the needs of the people. Paul was going beyond what predated him by incorporating male and females into the formula. It can even be seen that Paul was going against teachings that were presented in the Book of Genesis. Genesis 1:27 says that God made humanity as male and female and Genesis 1:31 states this creation was very good. By presenting a different idea than that of Genesis, Paul goes against some of most time-honored teachings. He is not concerned with the Law like most View More »

Read More

Related Essays on The Role of Women in the Church

  • Gender In Us Islamic And Orthodox Jewish Sacred Spaces

    6514 words, 27 pages

    ASMST 150 Introduction Across the globe there are millions of mosques and synagogues that serve as sacred sites for Muslims and Jews respectively. Each sacred site serves different purposes, including refuge for those less fortunate, a community center for the ethnic, a place of religious thought, a place of worship and prayer, and a place to share and rejoice with one another. The list goes on and on, but the underlying theme of all sacred sites is that they are to be a place of pilgrimage on the local, national, and global level. But pilgrimage for whom? There

    View Document »

    Scietific Revolution

    1147 words, 5 pages

    During the Scientific Revolution scientists such as Galileo, Copernicus, Descartes and Bacon wrestled with questions about God, human aptitude, and the possibilities of understanding the world. Eventually, the implications of the new scientific findings began to affect the way people thought and behaved throughout Europe. Society began to question the authority of traditional knowledge about the universe. This in turn, allowed them to question traditional views of the state and social order. No longer was the world constructed as the somewhat simple Ptolemaic Model suggested. The Earth for the

    View Document »

    English Paper

    572 words, 3 pages

    As one is growing up in this world, one thing that most parents try to stress on their kids is the importance of having God in his/her life. Kids are taught at a very young age to love and fear God at the same time, especially in the black community. Grandparents, mostly grandmas, are also a influence amongst young children to accept God into his/her life. Although it doesn’t have to be just them, for instance, in “Salvation” young Langston is most influenced by his aunt and Church family as a whole to be saved. Many people are confused at the actual concept of what it means to be saved.

    View Document »

    Speech On Religion

    2723 words, 11 pages

    The ethical issue I will be discussing is IVF, in relation to the Christian religions Catholic and Anglican. IVF is used in cases of infertility –where the woman’s fallopian tubes are absent or blocked, the men’s sperm count is low, or the couple’s infertility is unexplained. It is an assisted reproductive technology in which one or more eggs are fertilized outside a female’s body. To do this, eggs are collected from the ovaries and placed in a dish with a large number of sperm for approx. 18 hours. The eggs are then placed in a special growth medium which allows fertilizatio

    View Document »

    Women And The Media

    3196 words, 13 pages

    The Perfect Female Body: Long before beauty pageants, Barbie dolls, and extra-ordinarily beautiful girls, came about the idea of the female body. Whether you are a believer of creationalism, scientology, or evolutionism, somehow we all came about with the perception of the “perfect” female. Women have always been seen, and portrayed as a sex symbol, and usually the disobedient one. Dating back to B.C and the story of Adam and Eve, Eve was the naked one who bit into the fruit that god told her was forbidden. Why couldn’t it have been Adam that caused such scandal, and was the cause for

    View Document »

    Demographic Of Abortion

    2918 words, 12 pages

    The Demographics of Abortion Why do Women Choose to have an abortion? Introduction Every since the legislation was passed on Roe v. Wade that allowed women to have abortions there has been a great debate on the topic of abortion from the problems of having an abortion to the likely benefits of abortion. Legal induced abortion was defined as a procedure, performed by a licensed physician or someone acting under the supervision of a licensed physician, which was intended to terminate a suspected or known intrauterine pregnancy and to produce a nonviable fetus at any gestational ag

    View Document »

    To Kill A Mockingbird

    334 words, 2 pages

    In the fictional town of Maycomb County, Alabama, that Harper Lee used for her novel “To Kill a Mocking Bird”, the church life was very similar to the rest of the communities throughout the south at that time. Alabama is in the middle of the so called Bible belt. Church is a routine to the folks of Maycomb County. Their parents and grandparents went to church every Sunday; therefore, their kids are expected to do the same thing. Although the citizens attend church on a weekly basis it doe not seem to affect their everyday life. The community of Maycomb County all believe themselves to b

    View Document »

    Women In Hip-hop Magazines

    3404 words, 14 pages

    Hip-hop began as a form of African-American street culture in New York City during the 1970s (Watkins, 2001), but the art has expanded to become a multi-billion dollar industry (Atkinson & Halliday, 2003), mostly due to the success of rap music, the most widely publicized and marketed aspect. Media such as television and magazines are responsible for hip-hop’s global recognition today, allowing everyone from the United States to Germany and Korea to embrace the culture (Bennett, 1999). Hip-hop culture has made an enormous transition from its beginning stages to its current state. Early hip-hop

    View Document »

    Pornography In Media

    4393 words, 18 pages

    Pornography’s Effect on Sexual Crime Rates Overview: Our Research Topic Be it in film, magazines or even fiction, pornography has always been a controversial topic. It is many things to many people: a guilty pleasure, a shameful addiction, a stress relief, foreplay, an obscene creation or even a vulgar pastime. However, as time passes, pornography is becoming decreasingly taboo, and this could result in a significant impact on societal values and perceptions. Introduction: Questions and Objectives Long has there been war between those who are for pornography and those again

    View Document »

    Aids In Black Women

    1560 words, 7 pages

    Asa S. Smith AIDS/HIV in Women Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, better known as AIDS, is a raging epidemic. Taking nearly 2.1 million lives and 300,000 children are living with the disease and it shows no sign of slowing down. A person has a collection of symptoms and or illnesses caused by the most advanced stages of HIV or Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. Once the virus weakens your immune system, and your CD4 cells are reduced to a certain number, a patient is considered to have AIDS. This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves indiv

    View Document »

More Popular Essays

Research help is just moments away!