Macbeth Themes

998 words, 4 pages

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What is normally considered a refreshing and necessary human activity is "murdered" by Macbeth after he commits his heinous crime. Neither Macbeth nor his wife is able to sleep after killing Duncan. Macbeth's lack of sleep makes him a brutal killer; Lady Macbeth begins to sleepwalk and inadvertently reveals the source of her distress through her nightly babble. In addition, Macbeth gains an almost inhuman strength and courage after his first crime. He is more courageous in crime than he has ever been in virtuous deed, which is indeed bizarre.
A second theme in Macbeth is that of the tragic hero. A tragic hero is a character that the audience sympathizes with despite his/her actions that would indicate the contrary. Macbeth, in spite of his horrible murders, is a pitiable man. His saving grace is that he did not initially want to kill Duncan but later changed his mind after listening to his wife. In addition, Macbeth internally suffered because he could not enjoy his royal status. Fear, paranoia, exhaustion and sleeplessness plagued him despite his sovereignty. Lady Macbeth is also a tragic hero. Her initial courage and daring did not last long, and she quickly deteriorated into a delusional, hapless somnambulist. She broke down mentally and physically because of the strain of the crime. Macbeth and his wife are pitiable characters because the reader is able to follow their every thought and action. Thus, the reader sees not only their gruesome effects on the Scottish people but also on themselves.
Another important theme in Macbeth is that of indecision and internal conflict. Macbeth was indecisive up until the very night of the murder about whether or not he should kill Duncan. Afterwards, he was unsure of a course of action. He rashly decided to kill Banquo, visit the witches and remain confident even when his castle was besieged. Lady Macbeth's initial lack of indecision is what brought View More »

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