Man Up

752 words, 4 pages

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English R1B

Perhaps the most essential element to a boy’s development into a man is his father, for they provide a sense of strength, security, and act as a role model and mentor towards the growth of a child into a man. Yet, this was not the case for young Telemakhos from Homers The Odyssey. Telemakhos’ father, Odysseus has been lost at sea for almost all of his life, and because of this Telemakhos is not the man that he should be. The goddess Athena looks down from the heavens and decides to help young Telemakhos, sends him on a journey to find out more about his father. Instead of just telling him that Odysseus is still alive, she wants him to grow up into a man, hear stories about how great his father... View More »

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As Athena sends Telemakhos on his journey his becomes sure that Odysseus is his father when he hears from Nestor and Meneláos. Nestor states “I must say I marvel at the site of you:/your manner of speech couldn’t be more like his;/one would say No; no boy could speak so well” (39). Similiarly, Meneláos states that “Odysseus’ hands and feet were like this boy’s;/ his head, and hair, and the glinting of his eyes” (57). There was a “likeness” that even Helen expressed upon seeing Telemakhos (57). These affirmations then put Telemakhos at ease. They affirm him as his father’s son both in respect to his physical qualities and social capabilities and the way he presents himself. Telemakhos then truly starts to believe that he is his father’s son.
This then is the main point of the story that ties all of Athena’s reasons for helping Telemakhos together. Telemakhos finally becomes a man, and learns of his father’s journeys and adventures, and really has someone to look up to: his true father Odysseus. With this new found information and state of mind Telemkhos is given hope of his father’s return, and the strength and will to combat the suitors and later on create camaraderie with his father, the great Odysseus in doing so. Most importantly, Telemakhos has grown both as a character and as a man. He finally has this great man to look up to and in a sense is determined to fill his father’s shoes in whatever way possible.

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