To Waht Extent Is Masculinity Associated With Evil And Violence In Macbeth?

2428 words, 10 pages

Intro Sample...


He is described by King Duncan as a, “Worthy Gentleman!” (Act 1: Scene 2: Line 24)
The captain who reports the brave battle says, “Brave Macbeth, well he deserves that name.” (Act 2: Scene 2: Line 16)
Upon hearing these comments, Shakespeare has presented Macbeth to the audience as a patriotic and well- born character.

When Macbeth is told his fate by the three witches he can’t believe that such a thing could happen to him because in the time when Shakespeare wrote “Macbeth” witches were seen as a sign of evil and had close relations wit the devil, this is why I believe that deep down, Macbeth knew the witches were there to manipulate him, and not to help him reach his heart’s desire.
Nevertheless, Macbeth is still intrigued by what the witches have to say and yearns to find out more:
“But how of Cawdor” (Act 1: Scene 3: Lines 71). Macbeth then questions the witches on how they know of such events. By Macbeth tampering with evil forces makes him look like he wants to believe in such fate, by craving to know more of what is in plan for him.
When Rosses declares, “Call thee Thane of Cawdor,” ( Act 1: Scene 3: Line 104) Macbeth realises that the first prophecy of the witches has come true, this gives Macbeth reassurance that if he is now Thane of Cawdor then maybe there is still a chance of being king.

This is when Macbeth begins to have thoughts of killing Duncan: “My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical.” (Act 1: Scene 2: Lines 139). Macbeth finds these thoughts disheartening as he convinces himself that having these formidable thoughts of committing such deeds is not within his nature, but we notice the word, “ yet.”

In Act 1 Scene 7, Macbeth still seems buried under and overwhelmed by his thoughts on deciding whether or not to murder Duncan. He makes a decision not to go ahead with the act, but he then goes back on his decision by persuasion from Lady Macbeth. He seemed quite easy to manipulate as shown by the witches and View More »

Read More

Related Essays on To Waht Extent Is Masculinity Associated with Evil and Violence in Macbeth?

  • Macbeth Themes

    998 words, 4 pages

    One of the most important themes in Macbeth involves the witches' statement in Act 1, Scene1 that "fair is foul and foul is fair." (Act 1, Scene 1, Line 10) This phrase aptly describes the macabre status quo within the character Macbeth and without. When Macbeth and Banquo first see the weird sisters, Banquo is horrified by their hideous appearances. Conversely, Macbeth immediately began to converse with these universally known evil creatures. After hearing their prophecies, one can say that Macbeth considered the witches to be "fair" when in reality their intentions were quite "foul." Macb

    View Document »

    Problem Of Evil

    1904 words, 8 pages

    One well known philosophical dilemma, that causes much of humanity significant grief and frustration towards religious beliefs, is the problem of evil. John Hick explains in his essay, “The Problem of Evil”, that this ‘crisis’ so to speak is based on three characteristics that Christians claim God has. Christians believe that God has infinite knowledge, power and love. The question that is then raised is: Why is life on earth filled with vast amounts of suffering, pain and evil if God has never-ending abilities to embrace those three characteristics? John Hick provides two answers to

    View Document »

    Engr

    7783 words, 32 pages

    Meaning of Delinquent • One who fails or neglects to perform his duty; an offender or transgressor; one who commits a fault or a crime; a culprit. Failing in duty; offending by neglect of duty. Asynchronous Completion Token The Asynchronous Completion Token design pattern efficiently dispatches processing actions within a client in response to the completion of asynchronous operations invoked by the client. Also Known As Active Demultiplexing [PRS+99] Example Consider a distributed Electronic Medical Imaging System (EMIS) [PHS96] consisting of multiple component

    View Document »

    Fate In Macbeth, Julius Caesar, And Hamlet

    861 words, 4 pages

    Common Themes in Macbeth, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet Shakespeare utilizes the supernatural and fate to pave the destiny of some of his characters in his tragedies. Macbeth, Julius Caesar, and Hamlet appear to have a common novel theme of fate, betrayal to supremacy, and the struggle to restore providential power. Shakespeare uses rhetoric to effectively convey the idea of fate and the struggle against it. In all three of these Shakespearian tragedies characters encounter the emotion of disbelief and the struggle to seek refuge from fate and to ultimately live life as if it were their free

    View Document »

    Problem Of Evil

    1253 words, 6 pages

    It is a plain and simple fact, evil exists and it can be seen every where in today’s society. No matter how old or young, no matter where we look, whether it is in our textbooks or comic books, on TV or in our video games, evil is always there. There is evil of different types, with different causes and effects, with one event being more evil and has the power to stir up different emotions than the last. By examining opinions offered by people like John Hick, we can understand why God allows evil and the reasons extreme cases of destruction, as in “The Star” by Arthur C. Clarke to exist in our

    View Document »

    A Study Of: John Hick’s “The Problem Of Evil” And Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Star”

    1387 words, 6 pages

    Fall Term (2008) Essay Assignment A Study Of: John Hick’s “The Problem of Evil” and Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Star” Audrey Scott 4272258 PHIL1F91 Andrew T. Seminar 10 The Problem of Evil as outlined as John Hick is that “if God is perfectly loving, he must wish to abolish evil; and if he is all-powerful, he must be able to abolish evil. But evil exists; therefore God cannot be both omnipotent and perfectly loving” (Hick, 1963). In this essay the topic of John Hick’s solutions to “The Problem of Evil” will be looked at. Another subject matter that will be briefly deliberated on in this ess

    View Document »

    Violence Against Women

    2153 words, 9 pages

    A)Violence against Women -Wrestling with manhood -Violence is connected to manhood (real men invite confrontation, trash talk) -Fear and respect go hand in hand -Bark like a dog (subordination of women is part of the “man” package) -Comparison to women as a challenging idea (you are a “bitch”) -Chyna becomes so strong, she is stripped of femininity (later rejects public image) -violence as “deserved,” even really crazy awful sexual violence (“bark like a dog”) -“...it's only entertainment.” -Sex Trafficking (Trade) B)Gender

    View Document »

    Goldilocks Crisis

    7737 words, 31 pages

    Early European Theater • The writings of this period were primarily hymns, sermons and similar theologically oriented works. • Latin became a literary medium. • Major preserves of learning are the monasteries. • 8th century Europe returned to greater stability under the Carolingian kings. ? Charles Martel – defeated the Moslems at Tours in 732 AD, through his innovative use of armored horsemen as the principal military force, initiating the development of knighthood. ? Charlemagne – extended his realm into the Slavic territories and converting non- Chr

    View Document »

    Final

    20238 words, 81 pages

    Once upon a time, there was a prostitute called Maria. Wait a minute. 'Once upon a time' is how all the best children's stories begin and 'prostitute' is a word for adults. How can I start a book with this apparent contradiction? But since, at every moment of our lives, we all have one foot in a fairy tale and the other in the abyss, let's keep that beginning. Once upon a time, there was a prostitute called Maria. Like all prostitutes, she was born both innocent and a virgin, and, as an adolescent, she dreamed of meeting the man of her life (rich, handsome, intelligent), of getting married (

    View Document »

    Special Economic Zones In India

    21349 words, 86 pages

    Introduction to Economic Zones “Export else perish “ these are the words of first Prime Minister of India Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru. India being a continent like country having 30 states, more than 1000 languages and world second largest man power having diversified natural conditions right from Rain Forests of Kerala, Ice Mountains of Himalaya, Runn of Kuch to productive land of Bramahaputra has great potentials of world class export worthy products from various industries like Agriculture, Engineering, Chemicals, Software’s, Gems and Jewellry, Pharmaceuticals, Bio technology and many more.

    View Document »

More Popular Essays

Research help is just moments away!